All Hazards

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Definitions

European Definitions

While recognising the threat from terrorism as a priority, the European Programme for Critical Infrastructure Protection (EPCIP) considers the protection of critical infrastructure to be based on an all-hazards approach [1]. If the level of protective measures in a particular CI sector is found to be adequate, EPCIP urges stakeholders to "concentrate their efforts on threats to which they are vulnerable".

National Definitions

Australia

All-hazards approach deals with all types of emergencies or disasters and civil defence using the same set of management arrangements. [2]

Canada

Referring to the entire spectrum of hazards, whether they be natural or human-induced.

Se dit de la gamme complète des risques, qu’ils soient naturels ou d’origine humaine. [3]


“All-Hazards” approach does emphasizes the leveraging of synergies common across hazards and maintaining a streamlined and robust emergency management system. [4]

The “All-Hazards” approach also improves the ability of emergency management activities to address unknown hazards or risks.

All hazards incorporates natural and man-made hazards and threats, including traditional emergency management events such as flooding and industrial accidents; as well as national security events such as acts of terrorism; and cyber events. [5]


France

Danger: toute situation, condition ou pratique qui comporte en elle-même une capacité à occasionner des dommages aux personnes, aux biens ou à l’environnement.

(Unofficial translation) Every situation, condition or practice which could cause damages on people, assets or environment. [6]

Germany

All-hazard approach (in Deutsch: All-Gefahren-Ansatz) is [7] "taking all (known) hazards into consideration equally, for example when performing a risk analysis, and not only individual areas such as terrorism or sabotage".

Madagascar

Approche « Tous Risques »: Concerne tous les genres de catastrophes/urgences qui ont un impact sur les communautés et l’environnent en utilisant la même batterie de dispositifs de gestion et inclut à la fois les risques naturels et ceux causés par l’homme. [8]


Republic of Trinidad & Tobago

A classification encompassing all conditions, environmental or manmade, which have the potential to cause injury, illness, or death; damage to or loss of equipment, infrastructure services, or property; or alternatively causing functional degradation to social, economic, or environmental aspects. [9]

United States

A threat or an incident, natural or manmade, that warrants action to protect life, property, the environment, and public health or safety, and to minimize disruptions of government, social, or economic activities.It includes natural disasters, cyber incidents, industrial accidents, pandemics, acts of terrorism, sabotage, and destructive criminal activity targeting critical infrastructure. [10]

A grouping classification encompassing all conditions, environmental or manmade, that have the potential to cause injury, illness, or death; damage to or loss of equipment, infrastructure services, or property; or alternatively causing functional degradation to social, economic, or environmental aspects. [11]

Any incident or event, natural or human caused, that requires an organized response by a public, private, and/or governmental entity in order to protect life, public health and safety, values to be protected, and to minimize any disruption of governmental, social, and economic services. [12]

All hazards describes an incident, natural or manmade, that warrants action to protect life, property, environment, and public health or safety, and to minimize disruptions of government, social, or economic activities. [13]

All hazards is an approach for prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response, continuity, and recovery that addresses a full range of threats and hazards, including natural, human-caused, and technology-caused. [14]


Standard Definition

ISO 22300:2012(en)

naturally occurring events, human induced events (both intentional and unintentional) and technology caused events with potential impact on an organization, community or society and the environment on which it depends.[15]

See also

Notes

  1. Communication from the Commission of 12 December 2006 on a European Programme for Critical Infrastructure Protection, COM(2006) 786 final – Official Journal C 126 of 7.6.2007.
  2. Australian Emergency Management Glossary, Emergency Management Australia (1998)
  3. Vocabulaire de la gestion des urgencies/Emergency Management Emergency Management Vocabulary 281 (2012)
  4. An Emergency Management Framework for Canada (Second Edition)
  5. Federal Emergency Management Response Plan, 2009 (according to Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Resilience Strategy for Canada)
  6. INSTRUCTION GENERALE INTERMINISTERIELLE RELATIVE A LA SECURITE DES ACTIVITES D’IMPORTANCE VITALE N°6600/SGDSN/PSE/PSN du 7 janvier 2014, PREMIER MINISTRE, SECRETARIAT GENERAL DE LA DEFENSE ET DE LA SECURITE NATIONALE, Direction Protection et Sécurité de l’Etat N° NOR: PRMD1400503J
  7. UP KRITIS, BSI, 2014
  8. Stratégie Nationale de Gestion des Risques et des Catastrophes – Madagascar (2014)
  9. Comprehensive Disaster Management Policy Framework for Trinidad and Tobago
  10. Presidential Policy Directive -- Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience, PPD-21, 2013
  11. Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience Toolkit (Glossary), US Department of Homeland Security
  12. USCG, IM Handbook, 2006, Glossary 25-1
  13. National Incident Management Plan (core)
  14. NFPA-1600
  15. ISO 22300:2012(en) Societal security — Terminology